Kentucky Bankruptcy Law

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Keeping the Homestead Safe in Bankruptcy: Chapter 13

Bankruptcy continues to evoke this notion of getting something for nothing. For some,that results in feeling a bit of judgment or disdain towards the whole idea of filing bankruptcy or the people who end up there. To that I say, “There, only by the grace of God go I”. Others see it with a bit of a glimmer in their eye as a great way to get free stuff. Both views are askew. Bankruptcy is a tough process to go through that is humbling and often anxiety provoking which is why people prefer to hire a lawyer than attempt it pro se. Few people actually abuse the system; most who file have tried everything they could think of to avoid it, but life’s curve balls and the accumulation of mistakes here and there just prove too daunting without assistance. For those hard working folks who end up in a bad spot, I do what I can to make the process smooth and effective so they can get on rebuilding their lives financially.

One of the things I do to ease the way is to stress the imperative in Chapter 13 bankruptcies that if you want to keep it, you must pay for it. This applies to bigger ticket items with a loan secured against it like a house or a car. Many people opt for a Chapter 13 because they fell behind in their house payments or their car payments but they do not want to lose that property. Well, a Chapter 13 can certainly make that happen, but they must still pay for the house or the car. There are NO free houses out there – and the only free cars are ones your would not want to drive.

Chapter 13 only halts the secured lenders collection process (and helps reduce interest costs in certain ways). That means that foreclosure proceedings for a house are stopped and repossession of a car is nixed. Then, the arrears that had accumulated must still be paid through the Chapter 13 plan payments as well as each ongoing payment as it comes due. Unfortunately, many home owners had the pre-bankruptcy experience of months going by without making house payments before the bank took legal action. That will NOT be the experience in the bankruptcy. The secured lenders are much quicker to file a Motion for Relief from the Stay (the automatic collection halting part of a bankruptcy). This motion allows them to then resume the foreclosure in state court if it is granted.

Often, this motion is filed by the lender quickly after a payment or two is missed as a wake-up call to the debtor. They really just want the debtor to get caught up on their payments and so they typically will enter into an agreed order with the debtor to do just that over the next few months rather than force their motion through. However, this is an exceedingly expensive process. The lenders insist on getting reimbursed for the hundreds of dollars they spent on an attorney and filing fees for that motion. So, you may have used that $1,000.00 house payment or two to buy Christmas gifts or cover an unexpected medical bill, but you will end up eating around $600 or $700 on top of catching up those missed payments.

To make it through your Chapter 13 smoothly and retain your house and car, those payment simply have to be a non-negotiable. There is no wiggle room on secured debt payments in a Chapter 13. If you want to keep it, you must pay for it.

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December 19, 2014 Posted by | Additional Debt, attorney fees, Automatic Stay, Bankruptcy, Chapter 13, consumer debt | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Hidden Debt Collection Mechanism

Despite the fact that notices of judgment liens are sent to the Debtor, such notices are often ignored, misunderstood, or forgotten by the time the Debtor files bankruptcy. So, it is important for the Debtor to go down to the County Clerk and get a copy of ALL active liens against real estate. Since nothing bad immediate happens with a judgment lien against property, people tend to overlook them, so they are a hidden debt collection method that could survive bankruptcy.

In a Chapter 7 or a Chapter 13, one can avoid a judicial lien on property that impairs an exemption pursuant to 11 USC Sect. 522(f).  The most common way this plays out is that a creditor has filed suit, obtained a judgment, and then filed a lien on that judgment against your real property. This lien can sit dormant against your home for fifteen years, but it must be satisfied if the property is ever sold. Or, the creditor may pursue foreclosure but they rarely do that unless they believe there is enough equity in the property.

In order to strip off the judgment lien, your bankruptcy attorney must file a motion within the bankruptcy as a contested matter. In other words, if your attorney does nothing else, then the lien will survive the discharge. Previously, this was done within the plan of a Chapter 13, but the local rules have changed so that it must be done by motion in both Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcies.

If your attorney was unaware or the judgment lien or otherwise failed to file that motion to strip the lien, not all is lost. A decision in the Eastern District of Kentucky Bankruptcy CourtIn re Cross, Case No. 93-50547, the Debtors failed to strip the lien off their real property while the bankruptcy remained open. Twenty months after the case closed, the Cross’ reopened the bankruptcy and moved to have the lien stripped. Despite the passage of time and the creditor arguing that the Debtors waived the right to strip the lien based on so much time passing, the court still granted their motion.

October 15, 2014 Posted by | Assets, Bankruptcy, Chapter 7, Discharge, Exemptions, Property (exempt, Security interests | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

“I meant to do it, but I’m really sorry” doesn’t count in bankruptcy

A recented decision by the Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Kentucky reveals that bankruptcy is not the answer to relieve all debts, especially ones that come about by “willful” acts. In re Marklin, Case # 09-10939(1)(7) (Bankr.W.D.Ky., 2010) tells the tale of a farmer who borrowed over $100,000 to plant a crop. The bank held a security interest in the proceeds of the crop (a security interest is a legal right to get ownership of an asset if the debt isn’t paid). So far, this is all very common farming and banking practice.

Where things went wrong is that Mr. Marklin, with full knowledge that the bank held a security interest in the proceeds, sold the crop but kept all of the money for his own use. Now, I do not know that Mr. Marklin spent the money on luxury items or if he just used it to live off of and keep the farm going. It doesn’t really make a difference; what mattered to the court is that Mr. Marklin knew the security interest was in place but did what he did regardless.

Section 523(a)(6) of the bankruptcy code says that debts “for willful and malicious injury by the debtor to another entity or to the property of another entity” will not be discharged. Ordinarily, this section is thought to refer to the drunk driver who is not allowed to escape the debt of his injury when he wrecks into someone or an embezzler who stole funds. However, it has broader implications. For the person contemplating filing bankruptcy, it means that your intentions matter and that you need to operate in good faith towards creditors.

June 23, 2010 Posted by | Bankruptcy, Pre-filing planning, Security interests | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

File Chapter 7 – Lose your mobile home: How not to do this

A recent decision in the Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky highlights a mistake made too often in Chapter 7s where the debtor lives in a mobile home. In Kentucky, mobile homes are not terribly mobile and often remain in place and are occupied for decades. The legal term for mobile homes is “manufactured home” which also seems silly because all homes are manufactured in one way or another. Anyway, mobile homes get fixed to the land and people stop thinking of them as titled property such as cars, boats, trucks and trailers. However, they are titled.

Now, when one files a Chapter 7, everything they own and everything they owe go into an estate. They pull things back out by using exemptions and/or reaffirming secured debts. Often debtors keep their homes because they have enough exemption to cover the equity in their home and are able to pay the secured debt payments (the mortgage) when all their other debts are discharged. Each person can claim over $20,000 in homestead exemption using the Federal exemptions. So, if you own a home worth $120,000 and you owe $100,000 secured on the house, then you can use the exemption and keep the house by reaffirming the $100,000 secured debt.

Here is where the problem comes in for mobile homes. The only way a loan is secured against a mobile home is on the title as described in KRS 186A.190. Actually, there is one other way, but it involves surrendering the title and filing stuff with the county clerk and effectively converting the mobile home into a house from a legal standpoint. Anyway, most people do not do that. So, if there is a defect with the security interest on the title, then the loan is not perfected (it doesn’t count) and cannot be reaffirmed.

Like in In re Owens, 09-62087 (Bankr.E.D.Ky., 2010), if the title is defective in regards to the security interest, then you could lose your home. In other words, if there is a problem with the title then you may have no secured loan to reaffirm and not enough exemption to cover the difference. Then, the trustee will keep the mobile home, sell it (if you can’t come up with money to redeem it), and distribute the proceeds to all unsecured creditors. So, if you live in a mobile home, be sure that your bankruptcy attorney examines the title and makes sure that any security interest is properly in place.

June 23, 2010 Posted by | Security interests | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment