Kentucky Bankruptcy Law

Counsel with Care

Saving Your House: Mortgage Business Loans

I speak with many small business owners who have weathered tough financial struggles in their businesses and need some sort of relief. Inevitably, at least one business loan has insisted on a second mortgage against their house. This becomes problematic if the business person is forced into bankruptcy as a last resort and also wants to keep his or her residence. There are two possible sources of relief, only one of which do I address in this post and I am not going to touch on a Chapter 11 at all because that is nearly always to expensive for a small business.

11 USC Section 1322 provides for what one can and cannot do in a Chapter 13 plan. Section 1322(b)(2) basically says that you cannot modify a debt secured against one’s personal residence. However, that debt can ONLY be secured against one’s home to have this protection. In most cases, a business loans secured against the debtor’s personal residence is also secured against some other property, such as a building owned by the business or the assets and inventory of the business. These loans can be modified.

So, a business owner who wants to save their house can go into a Chapter 13 and “cram down” the principal of that business loan to the value of available equity in that home. The rest of the loan becomes unsecured and subject to discharge at the completion of the Chapter 13. If there is no equity, then the loan becomes wholly unsecured.

My usual caveat here: each particular debtors circumstance can impact whether or not the approach I am referencing would work. One should consult with a knowledgeable bankrutpcy attorney to determine whether all the details line up becuase navigating the bankruptcy code can be rather complex.

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June 29, 2017 Posted by | Bankruptcy, Business & small business, Chapter 13, Foreclosure, Plan, Planning, Pre-filing planning, Security interests, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Matching the Competition? How about going beyond!

I have written about this before, but it bears repeating. I am not offering smoke and mirrors here, but just straight up information. There is a competitor’s ad campaign that has garnered considerable attention and it promises to get a bankruptcy started for $78.00. The ad goes on to note that certain restrictions and qualifications apply to this offer. And, I am sure they do explain those once your come in to meet with them. I have not interviewed my competitors on this issue, so I cannot say with certainty, but I can only contemplate one way that they can actually get a bankruptcy started for $78.00 and that is in a Chapter 13. It just so happens that you can pay the $310.00 filing fee that the court charges for a Chapter 13 (or the $335.00 for a Chapter 7) in four monthly installments. Each installment for the Chapter 13 would be $77.50 and thus we have you entering into a Chapter 13 paying only that first installment (and rounding it up gives you the $78).

I can do this for you also. However, I would need to figure out how much of a plan payment you would be able to afford because paying payments each month makes up a Chapter 13 in contrast to a Chapter 7. That would be the restriction. The Chapter 13 can run as short as 36 months or as long as 60 months depending on your household income. Attorney fees run higher in a 13 than a 7 but those higher fees can be paid through the plan itself. I only recommend going this route if it is the only way you can get into a bankruptcy and get the relief you need. You must qualify for a Chapter 13 which includes having a regular source of income and that income must be sufficient to pay enough in a plan payment to cover the attorney fees, trustee commission, certain tax debts, and certain secured debt arrears. The hitch with going this route is that the less your pay up front on attorney fees, the higher the plan payment has to be after filing. That may be perfectly fine and work well, I just want you to know that in advance rather than when I have you already in my office. There is also a credit counseling course that must be done through a third party prior to filing and this can run anywhere from $10 to $25 directly to that company. This a legal requirement of the law and not something that can be circumvented.

How would I be able to go beyond a firm that can get you into a bankruptcy for $78.00?  Well, I do all the work myself. From the initial phone call to the initial meeting all the way through to the discharge order being issued at the end of the bankruptcy – it is all with me personally. That is to say, you will not be interacting with secretaries, paralegals or other attorneys (unless there is a true emergency); you will be interacting with me. I will be the familiar face that shows up with you at the meeting of creditors and the same voice on the phone who helps explain things along the way. That is simply how I chose to practice law, by keeping overhead low and doing it myself rather than shooting for high volume. That competitor does a fine job from what I can tell; it just done using lots of staff. If my individualized and personal approach appeals to you, then come in to see me and I will see if I can match any competitors’ offer for a bankruptcy or even go beyond what they have to offer. There is no charge for that initial consultation and I do NOT limit it to 1/2 an hour.

May 29, 2015 Posted by | Alternate Debt Relief, attorney fees, Bankruptcy, Chapter 13, Chapter 7, consumer bankruptcy, consumer debt, Credit Counseling & Debtor Education, Discharge | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Chapter 13 lasts awhile, but stay in touch

Chapter 13s last either three (3) years or five (5) years depending on a households income at the inception. That is quite a long time and it can be easy to let it fade into the background of one’s mind after settling into the rhythm of monthly payments to a Chapter 13 trustee. A debtor in a Chapter 13 likely had considerable contact with their attorney at the very beginning of the case, but this becomes less and less frequent after the plan is confirmed and all the claims have come in. After a couple of years, some old habits can creep back in, and the debtor may never think to contact their lawyer when faced with certain financial decisions.

Many of my Chapter 13 clients come to me to help save their home from foreclosure. A Chapter 13 is a grand tool for just such a thing. Most of these clients got to the point of facing a foreclosure action in State court because they made choices between paying a house payment and getting needed car repairs or paying for a necessary medical procedure. That first time of missing the payment, they likely started getting some calls, but nothing earth shattering happened. Next thing they knew, several missed payments have racked up, they are served with a civil summons, and the only way to catch them up is through a five-year Chapter 13.

Then Christmas rolls around that second year into the Chapter 13 and the belt-tightening budget worked out with the trustee really only left room for macrame’ gifts for the children or perhaps a Chia pet or two. It is heartbreaking for a parent when their children’s friends are getting the newest iPhone or PlayStation 4. Perhaps the car broke down again or the refrigerator they had been nursing along for an extra 10 year lifespan finally goes out. Well, that old pattern kicks in and it seems pretty harmless to miss a house payment. After all, nothing bad happened before until a good six months down the line. Well, bankruptcy is a different world.

Most home loan creditors will file a motion for relief from the automatic stay (the law that precludes them from going ahead with the foreclosure once bankruptcy is filed) with just one or two missed payments post-petition. Being in Chapter 13 basically puts them on high alert and they are much quicker to pull the trigger.

This is not the end of the world – yet. Their attorney can object to the motion and almost always work out an Agreed Order to get caught back up again in about six (6) months. However, there is a hefty price to be paid. The creditor will add in their own attorney fees and they will also likely insist on a drop-dead provision where if those payments do not roll in on time, the stay will be lifted without filing another motion and they can then proceed with the foreclosure.

The better course of action is to call one’s bankruptcy attorney to do some problem solving when an unforeseen expense comes about. In the Eastern District of Kentucky, the Chapter 13 Trustee typically does not oppose a motion to suspend plan payments for a month or three if there is a good reason. That is often enough to get past some unexpected expense and get back on track making up the payments. The upside to this is that the debtor will not get hit with hundreds more in attorney fees or end up on a probation sort of situation. So, even if it has been a long time since you talked to your bankruptcy attorney, if things go awry, call them first and get help.

January 15, 2015 Posted by | Additional Debt, Automatic Stay, Bankruptcy, Chapter 13, Disposable Income / Budget, Foreclosure, Plan, Plan payments, Planning, Pre-filing planning, Secured loan arrears | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Keeping the Homestead Safe in Bankruptcy: Chapter 13

Bankruptcy continues to evoke this notion of getting something for nothing. For some,that results in feeling a bit of judgment or disdain towards the whole idea of filing bankruptcy or the people who end up there. To that I say, “There, only by the grace of God go I”. Others see it with a bit of a glimmer in their eye as a great way to get free stuff. Both views are askew. Bankruptcy is a tough process to go through that is humbling and often anxiety provoking which is why people prefer to hire a lawyer than attempt it pro se. Few people actually abuse the system; most who file have tried everything they could think of to avoid it, but life’s curve balls and the accumulation of mistakes here and there just prove too daunting without assistance. For those hard working folks who end up in a bad spot, I do what I can to make the process smooth and effective so they can get on rebuilding their lives financially.

One of the things I do to ease the way is to stress the imperative in Chapter 13 bankruptcies that if you want to keep it, you must pay for it. This applies to bigger ticket items with a loan secured against it like a house or a car. Many people opt for a Chapter 13 because they fell behind in their house payments or their car payments but they do not want to lose that property. Well, a Chapter 13 can certainly make that happen, but they must still pay for the house or the car. There are NO free houses out there – and the only free cars are ones your would not want to drive.

Chapter 13 only halts the secured lenders collection process (and helps reduce interest costs in certain ways). That means that foreclosure proceedings for a house are stopped and repossession of a car is nixed. Then, the arrears that had accumulated must still be paid through the Chapter 13 plan payments as well as each ongoing payment as it comes due. Unfortunately, many home owners had the pre-bankruptcy experience of months going by without making house payments before the bank took legal action. That will NOT be the experience in the bankruptcy. The secured lenders are much quicker to file a Motion for Relief from the Stay (the automatic collection halting part of a bankruptcy). This motion allows them to then resume the foreclosure in state court if it is granted.

Often, this motion is filed by the lender quickly after a payment or two is missed as a wake-up call to the debtor. They really just want the debtor to get caught up on their payments and so they typically will enter into an agreed order with the debtor to do just that over the next few months rather than force their motion through. However, this is an exceedingly expensive process. The lenders insist on getting reimbursed for the hundreds of dollars they spent on an attorney and filing fees for that motion. So, you may have used that $1,000.00 house payment or two to buy Christmas gifts or cover an unexpected medical bill, but you will end up eating around $600 or $700 on top of catching up those missed payments.

To make it through your Chapter 13 smoothly and retain your house and car, those payment simply have to be a non-negotiable. There is no wiggle room on secured debt payments in a Chapter 13. If you want to keep it, you must pay for it.

December 19, 2014 Posted by | Additional Debt, attorney fees, Automatic Stay, Bankruptcy, Chapter 13, consumer debt | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The danger of short term loans on your house

You home is an incredible source of collateral for loans when there is equity (value minus debt secured against it), but there is also danger in using your home this way. There are still lenders who will do rather large, short-term loans secured against a private residence. These loans can be tempting because they often will provide for relatively low-interest loans. However, they can be dangerous. especially when they are balloon loans. Such loans are seductive because they have low monthly payments with a final huge payment due at the end.

I have seen these often used by people trying to get a business venture off the ground. However, people sign up for them for many reasons. The business folks are essentially betting on having a solid and very profitable business going in three to five years. I admire their confidence, but most businesses that survive take three years just to start making a modest return. And so, many find their balloon payment looming without adequate resources to cover the debt. Sometimes banks will roll it into a new loan, but there is no guarantee of this. Therefore, it is wise to talk to a lawyer who knows about bankruptcy prior to that maturity date.

Banks like loans against your personal residence because the revisions to the bankruptcy code back in 2005 gave special treatment to loans secured solely against one’s residence. Basically, 11 USC Section 1322(b)(2) prevents such loans from being modified in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Therefore, the only thing one can do is cure the arrears through the bankruptcy, but the underlying agreement remains intact. There is a nice little exception, though, found in 11 USC Section 1322(c)(2) for loans that come due DURING the Chapter 13. So, if one times things right and files a Chapter 13 BEFORE the last payment on your short-term loan is due, a Debtor CAN modify that loan to some extent.

The most likely use for this exception is to move the maturity date of the loan out for the duration of the Chapter 13 plan and thus provide for the cure of arrears on that loan. The Debtor still has to show that the lender is adequately protected, but that hurdle is usually overcome easily with real estate that is either holding its value or increasing in value. This is NOT a complete remedy, but it can buy more time for a Debtor to either find alternative financing that has no balloon payment or make those profits they hoped for that would cover the debt.

September 9, 2014 Posted by | Additional Debt, Adequate protection, Bankruptcy, Chapter 13, Financing, Foreclosure, Home Loan Modification, Home loan modifications, Plan, Plan payments, Planning, Pre-filing planning, Secured loan arrears, Security interests | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The scoop on the $71.00 bankruptcy ad

I posted awhile ago about a neighboring high-volume bankruptcy firms TV advertisements to “get your bankruptcy started for just $71.00”. I speculated on how they did that, but I have since learned what the deal is from a client who went to them first. She clearly was a candidate for a Chapter 7: below median income, no secured debt arrears, no priority debt, and nothing else that would lend itself to Chapter 13. However, she could not come up with the attorney fees to do the Chapter 7 right then. So, they offered to put her into a Chapter 13 with just $71.00 up front.

This seems like an acceptable approach. Basically the attorney is using the ability to have their fees paid through the Chapter 13 as administrative expenses. The up side for the debtor is that they get the relief from creditors including garnishment right away. The downside is that this is a much more expensive and involved process than the Chapter 7. Debtors need to be made aware of how much more they would pay in the long run for the Chapter 13 as compared to the Chapter 7 – sort of fair credit act kind of disclosure. Perhaps my colleague is giving that kind of disclosure – I have no reason to doubt that they are. If so, then I give them props for giving another option for debtors that needs relief from debt right away, but whom cannot afford the attorney fees.

May 28, 2014 Posted by | attorney fees, Bankruptcy, Chapter 13, Plan | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Trending in Chapter 13 in the Eastern District of Kentucky

The trustee’s office appears to be taking a closer look at expenses in Schedule J of Chapter 13 cases. Specifically, they appear to be pushing for decreasing recreational/entertainment expenses and miscellaneous expenses. Previously, this trustee’s office tended to utilize the standardized amounts provided for in the means test as a gauge. As a result, if a debtor reported a particular expense in excess of those amounts, I would encourage them to engage in “belt-tightening” in that area.

The interesting thing about those standardized expenses is people who make less money have lower expenses while people who make more money have higher expenses even when the family size is the same. In the prior approach, the trustee’s made some allowance for this dynamic. The trustee’s current approach seems to be to cram those relatively higher income families into the expense structure of the lower-income Chapter 13 families. Now, even if expenses fall within the standard allowance of the means test, the trustee is looking for deeper cuts.

On the surface, this seems fair – after all, why should richer people get to have higher expenses and still discharge their debts at the end? The problem comes down to human nature. Once people develop a set point of expenses, then it is extremely hard for them to do substantial cuts in those expenses. When one is talking about the extended timeframe of five years in a bankruptcy, well the likelihood of successfully maintaining extensive cuts drops dramatically.

So, what is the goal of Chapter 13? I suggest that we are best served when people successfully complete Chapter 13 plans. This will not happen when budgets are made so tight as to be unwieldy over time. Debtors will get into a tight spot with unexpected expenses and be unable to make their payments. This is not to suggest that people should get to engage in lavish lifestyles in a Chapter 13; rather, I suggest a balance between belt-tightening and sustainable budgets. Clothing makes for a good analogy: a really tight dress may look really trim and neat, but no one can wear it day in and day out. Rather, one needs slightly roomy clothes to go about their day-to-day business. Such an approach will increase Chapter 13 successful outcomes and, thus, increase the overall return to unsecured creditors.

May 28, 2014 Posted by | Bankruptcy, Chapter 13, Disposable Income / Budget, Plan, Plan payments | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Car Cares and the Chapter 13 Dilemma

While I often extol the virtues of Chapter 13 bankruptcy, there is one issue in them that can be most vexing to a Debtor in need of help. Nearly every Chapter 13 Debtor owns a car with a secured debt attached to it when they file. Previously I have talked about the benefit of being able to reduce the interest rate on high interest car loans through the Chapter 13 and even, when the debt is old enough, cram down the principal owed to the actual value of the car. These all remain true. However, there is a hidden danger to having a car loan in Chapter 13.

The danger lies in 11 USC Sect. 1235(a). This provision lists a number of things that must be true about a Chapter 13 plan for it to be confirmed. Conversely, if all the requirements of 1325 are met, the court must confirm the plan. Shaw v. Aurgroup Financial Credit Union, 552 F.3d 447 (6th Cir., 2009). The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals has issued case law based on this code provision that severely restricts the flexibility of a Chapter 13 bankruptcy in this one area of car loans. Those decisions are In re Adkins, 425 F.3d 296, 300 (6th Cir.2005) and In re Nolan, 232 F.3d 528 (6th Cir.2000).

Essentially, these two court opinions determine that once a plan is confirmed and the car lender’s claim is allowed, then it shall always be a secured claim. This may not sound formidable, but here is how the scenario plays out: Debtor has a car worth $7,000.00 which is working okay at the start of the plan. The plan gets approved and the secured claim is filed by the lender for $7,000.00. Perhaps there is another claim for excess debt on the car that is treated unsecured, but that does not matter in this situation. A couple of years into the plan, the car starts messing up and it becomes more costly to fix than the car is now worth. The Debtor, who is paying all their disposable income into their Chapter 13 cannot get the car fixed. So, they seek to modify the plan, surrender the car, and purchase a more roadworthy vehicle. They can only manage this if they can reduce their plan payment. They can only reduce their plan payment if the deficiency of the car loan, what’s left after the car is surrendered and auctioned, is unsecured debt. However, In re Adkins and In re Nolan preclude this.

That $7,000.00 cannot be re-characterized as unsecured. Let’s say the loan after two years of payments through the Chapter 13 plan is now $6,000.00 but the car auctions only for $1,000.00. That leaves a $5,000.00 deficiency. That $5,000.00 remains a secured debt that MUST be paid in full during the remainder of the Chapter 13 plan. The Debtor still must pay the exact same amount in plan payments and thus cannot afford to buy another vehicle. Now they have no car but they still must pay for their surrendered car in full.

The Sixth Circuit used solid statutory construction and policy considerations in coming to this result. They wanted to keep a Debtor from being able to enjoy a car for a while and then shift the depreciation value to the creditor. However, because the creditor knows they will be paid in full regardless of what they do, they have no incentive to realize the actual fair mark value of the car that was surrendered. The Debtor cannot sell the car due to the lien in place and the because of the Chapter 13 bankruptcy so they are stuck. They might as well keep the car and make do for the life of the Chapter 13.

The main point in all of this is to do a careful assessment of one’s vehicles and car loans prior to filing. Going into a Chapter 13 with high value cars that also have a high debt load can leave one with almost no wiggle room for the life of the Chapter 13. It would be best surrender such vehicles prior to confirmation of the plan and obtain an inexpensive used car prior to filing. And, if they have cars with debt, the Debtor needs to have some comfort that the car will actually last the life of the bankruptcy.

March 3, 2014 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Phone Adventures or “How does one get an “Account Transcript” from the IRS?”

This post is geared more towards attorneys practicing bankruptcy law, but it is useful to anyone trying to resolve income tax debt. I am following up on my last post about how to determine if income tax debt can be discharged in bankruptcy. First, as an attorney, you have to complete and have your client sign a Power of Attorney, Form 2848. Well, actually you have to back up a step further and obtain a CAF number from the IRS. You will need that CAF number in order to get anywhere with them.

Once the 2848 is completed, you send it in to the IRS so that they can either lose it or take weeks to process it. Oh, but do not worry, you can still proceed. You next want to get a Form 4506-T completed. You really should do this at the same time as the 2848 to save time. There are fax numbers of the back of the 4506 to send it to  and you only have to try that fax number a dozen or so times. More recent years can be obtained by calling the automated number for the IRS, but the transcripts can only be sent directly to the taxpayer’s address if you go that route.

Once the Account Transcripts come in, you need to look for those “520” codes I mentioned in the last post. If there are any on the transcripts, you will want to spend a leisurely afternoon on the phone listening to the Internal Revenue Services music interrupted by occasional transfers to different departments. Once you get to the right place, you will be grilled about who your are. They will look in the system and fail to find the 2848 that you had dutifully sent in per the instructions. Just go ahead and have a copy of the 2848 at hand because the person helping you will ask you to fax it directly to them.

Once that 2848 is in front of them, they will ask you to repeat information that is clearly spelled out on the form itself to “verify” things. It seems this only verifies that you faxed them the very same document they are looking at, but no matter. Now you are cooking with GAS – well, perhaps kerosene. It will just take a few seconds to get the closing code. If you want to forgo this whole experience, then look for a code “971” and see it there is one whose dates corresponds to the “520”. If so, you are safest to assume that the closing code is 77.

PS: By the by, attorneys, this is a time intensive and liability laden analysis, so be sure to charge separately from the bankruptcy for this procedure.

PPS: Be sure to get your client’s dates of birth – the IRS sometimes asks for this to verify that you are whom you say you are.

January 28, 2014 Posted by | Bankruptcy, Chapter 13, Chapter 7, Planning, Pre-filing planning, Tax Debts | , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Surprising Facts About Income Tax Debt and Bankruptcy

I just finished an analysis of whether over $90,000.00 in income tax debt from 2003 to 2005 could be discharged for a client through bankruptcy. The surprise answer for them was that it would be discharged completely in a Chapter 7 or a Chapter 13. Many have the mistaken belief that income tax debt never goes away; even many attorneys assume you must pay it no matter how far behind you find yourself. The truth is, there is a series of time-based limits set on income tax debts and once those limits are reached, the tax is treated like any other unsecured debt in bankruptcy.

To know whether a tax debt can be discharged in bankruptcy, one must obtain an “Account Transcript” for each year in which tax debts are owed. This transcript has a series of three digit codes along with dates for those codes and sometimes dollar amounts listed. Certain codes matter more than other. For example, one must make sure there are no “320’s” because that indicates an assertion that there was fraud involved in the tax return filed. Then, one needs to ascertain the dates of any penalties assessed by scrutinizing codes 290, 294, 298, 300 and 304. These penalties are also subject to the time limits but have to be addressed separately due to different stating dates.

Another code that makes a huge difference is the “520” code.  A 520 event is one that may or may not cause a stand still (a “tolling”) of those time limits from running. Just finding the 520 code is not enough because one must CALL the Internal Revenue Service to find out what the “closing code” is. The closing code will be a “77” or a “90”.  The 77 closing code means the time between the 520 date and the following 521 or 522 closing date did toll the time making it take longer to be able to discharge the debt. There is also code “480” that happens when there is an “offer in compromise” proposed. A 480 event also tolls the time until the tax debt can be discharged.

If you have done your best to pay your income tax debt and it is just too big a burden, go a an attorney who can analyze a Tax Account Transcript. Find out if you can get a fresh start even from income tax debt.

January 28, 2014 Posted by | Bankruptcy, Chapter 13, Chapter 7, Tax Debts | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment