Kentucky Bankruptcy Law

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Delinquent Property Tax Claims in Chapter 13 Cases

In my practice, I have found it important to do just as this post advises: review claims filed carefully to make sure interest accrues only as allowed by law and for the attorney fees added in. Statue also guides the amounts that can be charged in attorney fees.

Furthermore, it is incredibly valuable to make sure the Debtor gets a copy of ALL active liens on their property just prior to filing the Chapter 13. And, after the bankruptcy is filed, to make sure the claims are filed on all of those liens. It just makes things nice and clean when the Chapter 13 concludes.

Chapter 13 Trustee, EDKY: Trustee's Blog

Property taxes on real estate in Kentucky constitute a statutory lien on the property. Under state law (KRS Chapter 134), the lien has priority over any other debt on the property. If the property were to be sold, property tax claimants are paid ahead of any mortgages or other liens. How should delinquent property tax claims be treated in a chapter 13 case? Practitioners first need to understand what happens to delinquent property taxes under state law.

When property taxes are unpaid as of April 15 and the sheriff files the uncollected tax claims with the county clerk, those unpaid tax bills, along with certain fees and costs, become certificates of delinquency which can be and frequently are sold to third party purchasers.

The purchaser of the certificate of delinquency is now the first priority lienholder. The lien secures not only the tax owed, but interest, penalties, fees, commissions, costs…

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January 26, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Lessons Learned the Hard Way

As an attorney primarily serving debtors, many of whom are in Chapter 13 bankruptcies, these “Lessons Learned” are quite valuable. As for the first case described, that may not be the end of the road for those debtors. Depending on how severely their income was restricted and if/when they may have received a discharge in a prior bankruptcy, a subsequent Chapter 7 may give them a fresh start. However, if they could not afford the Chapter 13, they would need to surrender the motorcycle in the Chapter 7.

As for the second case discussed, I find that it is very, very common that debtors miss various deadlines. This happens most often in a Chapter 13 with reporting bonuses and with step-ups in payments. These increases in plan payments often occur because loan repayments on 401k loans are completed and this is planned for at the beginning of the Chapter 13. With the loan repaid, they have more income to devote to the plan. I strongly encourage my clients to create an electronic calendar, such as a Google calendar, and go ahead and input every deadline for the duration of their plan with reminders.

Attorney’s can advise and inform, but ultimately it is your life and livelihood, so be sure to be pro-active by being organized. Sometimes, disorganization was a factor that led to the financial challenge to begin with, so forcing this discipline of advance scheduling may help stay on track after the bankruptcy concludes.

Chapter 13 Trustee, EDKY: Trustee's Blog

When debtors cannot comply with terms of a confirmed plan due to unexpected circumstances, the noncompliance cannot always be fixed by modifying the plan or seeking court approval after the fact.  This post is about two cases that were dismissed for reasons you might find surprising (but shouldn’t).

Case #1 – Keeping “Toys”:  Debtors proposed a 100% plan in exchange for keeping a Harley and three vehicles.  They only had about $7,000 in general unsecured claims, but they really wanted to keep their Harley and a truck they didn’t need, and they had a very good income at the time.  Plan confirmed.

By month 50, the debtors’ income dropped because their employers cut back on hours and reduced hourly rates, and the debtors fell behind in plan payments.  They tried to modify the plan to surrender the Harley, lower plan payments, and substantially reduce the dividend to unsecured creditors. …

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December 28, 2016 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Miscellaneous Hot Topics in the EDKY

Most of the items in this Chapter 13 Trustee’s blog post pertains mainly to your Chapter 13 attorney. However, the section about obtaining a new car while in your Chapter 13 is very pertinent to you as a Debtor. This is no longer a streamlined process. Now, you will have to have a more in-depth communication with you attorney. Also, you will need to plan on spending more time shopping around for the least expensive car that will meet your needs and a reasonable interest rate.

You may think you are limited to the buy here/pay here type of car sales. However, most of the larger new and used car dealers are familiar with Chapter 13 issues and they will work with you. One of the things your car dealer needs to understand is that the new debt would not be discharged at the end of the Chapter 13 so it is “safe” to loan to you in that respect. It could be surrendered and discharged if you convert to a Chapter 7, but let’s not go there. No need to make your dealer nervous.

Chapter 13 Trustee, EDKY: Trustee's Blog

This post briefly discusses the following topics: Amended Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure eff. 12/1/16; Motions to Incur Debt for Purchase of Vehicle; Motions to Compel Debtors to File Notices of Address Changes; and the 2017 Judge Joe Lee Bankruptcy Institute.

AMENDED FEDERAL RULES OF BANKRUPTCY PROCEDURE BECAME EFFECTIVE 12/01/2016:  Of particular importance to creditors’ attorneys is Rule 3002.1(a), which governs notices relating to claims secured by a security interest in the debtor’s principal residence.  The rule is now applicable to claims “for which the plan provides that either the trustee or the debtor will make contractual installment payments.”  The amended rule also provides that unless the court orders otherwise, the notice requirements of Rule 3002.1 cease to apply when an order terminating the stay is entered.

All practitioners should note that Rule 9006(f) removes the 3-day additional time for taking action if service is by electronic means.

MOTIONS…

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December 8, 2016 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

‘Tis the Season

Every year I offer just a bit of information about Christmas shopping. We all feel the push to buy nice presents for those whom we love. But, if your budget is tight and you have begun to wonder about whether you might have to file bankruptcy in the coming months, then take care. This is because debt for “luxury items” may not be part of a discharge of debt. Luxury items are defined in statute as being over a certain dollar amount. Also, debt incurred in anticipation of bankruptcy may also fail to be discharged in a bankruptcy. So, enjoy the season. Know that the best present is to be present for your loved ones. And manage debt wisely.

November 14, 2016 Posted by | Uncategorized | 1 Comment

How to Choose a Bankruptcy Lawyer

Mr. Rodgers offers some great insights. Many potential clients call mainly to find out the cost and pick the least expensive provider. I would add to what John says that a person shopping for a bankruptcy attorney should also look for the degree of personal, one on one time the attorney provides in answering your questions and concerns.

Kentucky Bankruptcy Attorney - Call Toll Free Today 1-888-651-9353 or 270-651-7777

It’s not always the most expensive bankruptcy lawyers that are the best or the cheapest that are the worst. In most areas, the prices for filing bankruptcy are determined by the market. The filing fees and credit counseling fees are set fees. The attorney fee, in most cases can vary. (The exception is Chapter 13 where, in most jurisdictions, the price is set by the court)

One of the most important things to look for, other than price, is the experience of the lawyer. How many bankruptcy cases do they usually handle per month? How many cases have they filed in the last year ?

Is the lawyer a member of any bankruptcy attorney professional associations ? The National Association of Consumer Bankruptcy Attorneys is the largest professional association of consumer bankruptcy attorneys representing folks filing bankruptcy. If a lawyer is a member, chances are good that they stay current…

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November 11, 2016 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The Entrepreneurship – Bankruptcy Intersection

Entrepreneurs who launch their own small business are brave souls. I applaud them and share in their story. Launching into the practice of law with nothing rather than working for a salary or wages was risky. The common observation is that a substantial percentage of small businesses do not survive past the three year mark. Of those that do go beyond that milestone, some thrive and some limp along. The debt that usually accompanies a business start-up and the extent to which creditors will work with these business owners can determines these outcomes. In a sense, when a small business goes into debt, they become partners with the lender and that partner can make or break it. This is where entrepreneurship and bankruptcy intersect.

The typical scenario for entrepreneurs is that they are “all in” to birth their endeavor. They become personally obligated on the debts and usually collateralize their home and other assets. It is no surprise when small business owners blur the lines and end up identifying with their business as if it is an extension of themselves because they pour themselves into their fledling enterprise. Unfortunately, this over-identification often keeps the owners from seeing when the business has gone past the point of no return. That leads to the proverbial “good money after bad” scenario.

Compounding the dilemma for these entrepreneurs who have businesses that are failing to thrive is that the bankruptcy code only offers two options. I am not referring to Chapter 11 as an option because the business reorganization chapter of the bankruptcy code is a very expensive endeavor. Even with the changes to the code that made it easier for smaller businesses and individuals to file an 11, it is still cost prohibitive to the vast majority.

The two options are either shutting the business down and filing a personal bankruptcy, or attempting a “work-out” with the lenders. A work-out is essentially a systematic negotiation with lenders one on one to get enough relief to keep the doors open. This only happens when the lenders can see an upturn in revenue coming soon and when all the lenders are willing to cooperate. Only one lender drawing their line in the sand derails any work-out.

A personal bankruptcy can be filed in conjunction with an ongoing work-out. It might be the element that makes the lenders realize how serious the situation is so that they decide their best chance of getting paid is to cooperate. Unless the attorney in that personal bankruptcy and work-out are savvy, though, the owner could end up right back on the hook realizing no real relief from the bankruptcy.

The more likely way a personal bankruptcy plays out is coupled with the dissolution of the business. There is little to no benefit to the business entity filing a Chapter 7 because it does not receive a discharge of debt. The only time it would be beneficial is if the business has substantial assets. Then the bankruptcy allows for the controlled distribution of those assets to lenders. Usually, though, the business has few assets and so it is just dissolved prior to the filing of the personal bankruptcy.

After the bankruptcy is filed, a new business could be formed, but it needs to be done in consultation with the bankruptcy attorney. This approach is cleanest with a Chapter 7, but it can work with a Chapter 13. Usually the income of the debtor going into a bankruptcy determines whether they do a Chapter 7 or a Chapter 13, but there is a means test exception for individuals who have predominantly business related debt. So, most small business owners can do a Chapter 7. Personal debt does include one’s home loan though, and that is usually the largest personal debt weighing in against the business debt. The attorney needs to analyze the debts to insure there is more business debt than personal, and the formula used differs from circuit to circuit.

Even if you qualify for a business related Chapter 7, there may be other reasons to pursue a Chapter 13. One of the most common reasons for a Chapter 13 is when there are payroll tax arrears that end up being assessed personally to the owner. Another reason may be to cure priority income tax arrears. A Chapter 13 provides an avenue to cure these arrears over five years.

November 8, 2016 Posted by | Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Making Chapter 13 Plan Payments in the E.D. Ky. – New Online Payment Option

This will add a much appreciated and helpful payment option so that clients do not have to be concerned about checks through the mail. I do receive inquiries by clients from time to time where they are concerned that a check they mailed had not yet cleared the bank.

Chapter 13 Trustee, EDKY: Trustee's Blog

Debtors can now make their chapter 13 plan payments in EDKY online (for a fee) through www.TFSbillpay.com (“TFS”).  Debtors’ attorneys, here is what you need to know about this new service.

First, payment by payroll deduction is still required by KYEB-LBR 3070-1, unless otherwise ordered by the court or agreed to by the trustee.

I generally agree to waive the payroll deduction requirement for debtors who:  do not receive regular income from wages; have seasonal employment; work part-time and don’t earn enough to cover the plan payment; or change jobs often.

Even if a debtor is making regular plan payments by payroll deduction, payments for tax refunds, bonuses, other lump-sum payments, or to catch up delinquent plan payments will not be made by payroll deduction.

In all of those instances, debtors might prefer to make online payment via TFS rather than paying by check, money order, or ACH bank draft. …

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October 31, 2016 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

“I’ve Changed My Mind – I Want to Surrender My House”: What Effect Does Post-Confirmation Surrender Have on the Debtor’s Discharge?

The debtor’s attorney needs to take the time to discuss the probability of maintaining house and other secure debt payments over the course of the Chapter 13 – 3 or 5 years. A vehicle that may not survive the life of the bankruptcy but with significant debt may need to be surrendered at the outset.

Changing one’s mind about surrendering a house within a confirmed Chapter 13 could be a huge issue unless the debtor was eligible for a Chapter 7 at the inception of the Chapter 13. If they were eligible, but chose a 13 for other reasons, then the best practice would be to convert to a Chapter 7 and surrender the house in that bankruptcy.

Chapter 13 Trustee, EDKY: Trustee's Blog

If a confirmed plan provides that the debtors will cure arrearages through the plan and maintain ongoing payments on a mortgage or long-term car loan, and the debtors complete plan payments and get a discharge, those section 1322(b)(5) debts are not discharged per section 1328(a)(1).  The debtors still have personal liability on those debts after discharge, just as if the debtors signed reaffirmation agreements in chapter 7 cases.

But what happens if after confirmation the debtors change their mind – they can’t afford the house or the car, and they let the creditor get relief from stay.  Is the claim still a 1322(b)(5) claim that is excepted from discharge?

Even if a creditor gets relief from stay on a 1322(b)(5) claim after confirmation, the creditor’s claim remains a 1322(b)(5) claim according to In re Holman, 2013 WL 1100705 (Bankr. E.D. Ky. 2013).  Taken to its logical conclusion, any resulting…

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October 24, 2016 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Nondischargeable Debts in Chapter 13 Cases

This is such beneficial information for creditors, but also for debtors who suspect such a claim would be filed against them.

Chapter 13 Trustee, EDKY: Trustee's Blog

We all know that section 523 contains exceptions to discharge, but some of those nondischargeable debts, including 523(a)(6) debts (for willful and malicious injury) CAN BE discharged in a chapter 13 case when the debtor completes plan payments.   If you represent creditors, you need to know how and when to seek nondischargeability under 523(a)(6) in chapter 13 cases.

Look at the first sentence in 523(a):  “A discharge under section 727, 1141, 1228(a), 1228(b), or 1328(b) of this title does not discharge an individual debtor from” the debts listed in 523(a).

There are two discharge options in a chapter 13 case:

  • the debtor can get a discharge upon completion of plan payments under 1328(a); or
  • if the debtor has not completed plan payments, s/he can still get a so-called hardship discharge under 1328(b) if certain conditions are met.

Read the first sentence of 523(a) again – those 523(a) debts are nondischargeable…

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October 21, 2016 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Let’s be reasonable

It is Christmas time! For many, this is a time of reflection and celebration of the birth of Jesus. For them and for many others, it is a time of celebrating one another and the giving of gifts. Hopefully, this gift giving is done out of the excess of resources that people find in their lives but, honestly, we know that a huge percentage of those gifts are purchased on lines of credit. As a bankruptcy attorney, I have noticed a seasonal drop in the number of bankruptcy filings in November and December followed by an uptick a few months later.

The courts and trustees recognize this seasonal event and seasonal spending as well but, let’s be reasonable in it because abuse has consequences. There are a few laws in place in the bankruptcy code that prevent debtors (the name given to the person who has the debts and seeks bankruptcy protection) from abusing the creditors (what those companies or persons are called who extend lines of credit).  The chief provisions are found in 11 USC Sect. 523(2)(C)(i)(I) & (II).

The first one prevents debts being discharged if the money owed went to purchase “luxury goods”. A luxury good is defined as a single item or service that is worth more than $500.00.  If this item was purchased using borrowed money from a single creditor within ninety days of the date the bankruptcy is filed, then that creditor has a valid objection to that particular debt getting discharged. Because of inflation, $500.00 does not go as far as it used to, so more and more things will count as luxury goods. I do not mean to suggest creditors pursue these claims often, because they do not, but it could happen and I would hate for you to be a creditor’s test case.

There is a sort of “safe haven” for luxury goods that specifies that they are NOT items or services to meet the needs of the debtor or a dependent of the debtor. So, if someone needs to get groceries, medical care, car repairs, or replace a NECESSARY and defunct appliance such as a dead refrigerator, then the luxury good prohibition does not apply even if purchased during Christmas. It must not be a gift for someone and, let’s still be reasonable, just because your refrigerator stops workings on the eve of a bankruptcy does not give license to buy the very best replacement (usually though, appliances purchased on credit create a type of debt called a purchase money security interests or PMSI which is a whole separate topic).

The second prohibition is for cash advances that aggregate more than $750.00 from an open end line of credit within seventy days of the filing date of bankruptcy. A an open ended line of credit is typically an unsecured signature loan or a credit card. Here, one needs to be careful because multiple cash advances from one line of credit can end up surpassing that limit in those seventy pre-filing day pretty quickly.

Finally, there is a specific protection built into the Chapter 7 bankruptcy laws. Some refer to Chapter 7 as “full” or “whole” bankruptcy though that is a bit of a misnomer. Anyway, 11 USC Sect. 727 stops ALL debts from being discharged if the debtor has engaged in fraud in creating their debts or obtaining a discharge of those debts. This statute has been interpreted on a practical level to require a pattern of conduct by the debtor instead of a single incident since it stops the discharge entirely rather than individual debts.

So, enjoy the season. Be generous from the bounty you have. Use credit judiciously if you must to meet your family’s needs. And feel free to contact us if you end up buried under more debt than you can handle.

Merry Christmas!

 

December 8, 2015 Posted by | Alternate Debt Relief, Assets, Bankruptcy, Chapter 7, Discharge, Pre-filing planning, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment