Kentucky Bankruptcy Law

Counsel with Care

The danger of short term loans on your house

You home is an incredible source of collateral for loans when there is equity (value minus debt secured against it), but there is also danger in using your home this way. There are still lenders who will do rather large, short-term loans secured against a private residence. These loans can be tempting because they often will provide for relatively low-interest loans. However, they can be dangerous. especially when they are balloon loans. Such loans are seductive because they have low monthly payments with a final huge payment due at the end.

I have seen these often used by people trying to get a business venture off the ground. However, people sign up for them for many reasons. The business folks are essentially betting on having a solid and very profitable business going in three to five years. I admire their confidence, but most businesses that survive take three years just to start making a modest return. And so, many find their balloon payment looming without adequate resources to cover the debt. Sometimes banks will roll it into a new loan, but there is no guarantee of this. Therefore, it is wise to talk to a lawyer who knows about bankruptcy prior to that maturity date.

Banks like loans against your personal residence because the revisions to the bankruptcy code back in 2005 gave special treatment to loans secured solely against one’s residence. Basically, 11 USC Section 1322(b)(2) prevents such loans from being modified in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Therefore, the only thing one can do is cure the arrears through the bankruptcy, but the underlying agreement remains intact. There is a nice little exception, though, found in 11 USC Section 1322(c)(2) for loans that come due DURING the Chapter 13. So, if one¬†times things right and files a Chapter 13 BEFORE the last payment on your short-term loan is due, a Debtor CAN modify that loan to some extent.

The most likely use for this exception is to move the maturity date of the loan out for the duration of the Chapter 13 plan and thus provide for the cure of arrears on that loan. The Debtor still has to show that the lender is adequately protected, but that hurdle is usually overcome easily with real estate that is either holding its value or increasing in value. This is NOT a complete remedy, but it can buy more time for a Debtor to either find alternative financing that has no balloon payment or make those profits they hoped for that would cover the debt.

September 9, 2014 Posted by | Additional Debt, Adequate protection, Bankruptcy, Chapter 13, Financing, Foreclosure, Home Loan Modification, Home loan modifications, Plan, Plan payments, Planning, Pre-filing planning, Secured loan arrears, Security interests | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Cars and Chapter 13

I have written in the past about the ability to “force” down interest high interest rates on car loans in a Chapter 13 and even to decrease the principal mount due on cars purchased over two and a half years prior to the bankruptcy. These are tremendous benefits to a Chapter 13, but there is a downside to including your vehicle to be paid through the plan. That is, at least in the Sixth Circuit which includes Kentucky.

The case, In re Nolan, 232 F.3d 528 (6th Cir. 2000) is the prevailing law in Kentucky on surrendering a car after a Chapter 13 plan has been confirmed. Whereas some other courts have adopted only a “good faith on the totality of the circumstances test” as to whether surrendering a car post-confirmation allows the claimed debt to become an unsecured debt, the Nolan case precludes such judicial discretion.

Nolan dictates that if a debtor seeks to surrender a car that is being paid through a confirmed Chapter 13 plan, the creditor still gets paid in full through the plan. The creditor gets to seize the car and auction it, applying the sale price to the debt owed. However, cars rarely auction for much and so most of the debt remains. Since that debt, which outside of bankruptcy would become an unsecured deficiency debt, must be paid in full, then debtor will likely not be able to decrease their plan payment much if at all. All the other unsecured creditors realize no benefit, nor any noticeable harm.

The debtor’s position is harmed even though they will be making the same plan payment as before. This is because they are likely having to purchase a new vehicle which will NOT be paid through the plan. This makes the debtor budget all the tighter and possibly untenable.

October 30, 2013 Posted by | Additional Debt, Bankruptcy, Chapter 13, Disposable Income, Financing, Plan, Planning, Pre-filing planning, reaffirm or surrender), Security interests | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tips for Tough Times #3

One of my repeated themes is to seek legal counsel early. This is a variation on the theme of seeking counsel when trouble first rears it head so that you can plan for the worst case eventuality. This post is geared towards those entrepreneurial spirits out there who are forging ahead with starting their own businesses. It takes an extra measure of courage to do this in this post-recession recovery period (I am not entirely convinced that we are post-recession, but let’s go with it). And, along with that extra measure of courage I recommend an extra measure of counsel.

For by wise guidance you will wage war, And in abundance of counselors there is victory. Proverbs 24:6 (NASB)

And, while starting a business is not as bloody as waging war, it is indeed a financial battle. So, I recommend getting counsel from a lawyer all the way from setting up the proper corporate entity to tips on financing that can save you down the road. While talking to a lawyer about your business idea may not be the most inspiring and motivating conversation, it can be a lifesaver for you finances. This is because lawyers are trained to think about and plan for worst case scenarios – those eventualities you do not want to contemplate. The conversation, then, may feel like it is taking wind from your sails. However, making sure the right documents are in place from the inception of your business all the way to how to sign on promissory notes can make a huge difference when times are tough.

March 15, 2013 Posted by | Bankruptcy, Business & small business, Financing, Planning, Pre-filing planning, Solo & Small Firm | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment