Kentucky Bankruptcy Law

Counsel with Care

Answering a lawsuit on your own

Having a sheriff or constable hand you a summons and complaint (a lawsuit) is an awful feeling. If you have been served with a lawsuit, then you really should consult a lawyer about the particulars of the complaint. This post should not be a substitute for obtaining individualized legal advise. However, I also know that not everyone has access to legal representation. If you are being sued for non-payment of a debt, then you likely have a hard time finding the funds to retain counsel. So, I am offering a few pointers in filing an answer to a complaint in order to protect your interests.

First, though, I want to suggest you reach out to a modest means or pro bono legal clinic if you cannot obtain private counsel. In the Bluegrass area and Eastern Kentucky you can contact: Legal Aid of the Bluegrass, The Fayette County Bar Association, and AppalReD.

Again, this is not a substitute for legal advice:

In Kentucky, a state court lawsuit must be answered within twenty (20) days of being served with the complaint. If the 20th day falls on a weekend or holiday, you have until the next weekday to file your answer, though I always err on the side of filing it a day or two early. If your goal is to delay the lawsuit as long as possible while you pull things together for bankruptcy, then you will wait until the last day of your time before filing your answer (again, I shave a day off just for an abundance of caution). Filing an answer consists of delivering your original, signed answer to the clerk and mailing a copy to each lawyer (or unrepresented party) listed on the complaint you received by first class mail. You do not need to send it certified mail.

The answer consists of three parts. The first part is the “style” of the case. It is all the stuff on the heading of the complaint, except you do not have to list the addresses of the parties – just their names – and you call it an “Answer” rather than “Complaint”. The case number is the most important part because you want the clerk to file your answer in the right case.

The second part is where you either admit or deny the allegations in the complaint. This is where a bit of lawyer speak comes in: if do not know something for certain, but suspect it may be true, you can still deny it by saying “I cannot confirm or deny such and such allegation of the complaint, therefore I deny the same.” You must do this because anything you admit in your answer is not longer a controversy. So, if the lawsuit is filed by the original creditor that you borrowed money from, then you can admit that you owe them a debt, but still deny the exact amount they are claiming is owed. However, if the lawsuit is brought by a collection agency or a party claiming that the debt was assigned to them, you may suspect that to be true, but you really do not know for sure that it was assigned to them correctly. So, you can deny owing that party a debt altogether as well as the amount they claim is owed. You must sign this part of the answer, but do NOT sign for anyone else. If you and your spouse are being sued for the same debt, you each must sign the answer or risk being found to be practicing law without a license.

The third part must also be signed (so you will sign your answer twice). This part simply is a statement saying that you put a copy of your answer into the mail, US Post, first class postage, and then list each party or their lawyer and the address you mailed it to. Again, sign after this statement and make sure you actually do send a copy to that party or lawyer.

Filing the answer can either be hand delivery to the clerk or by mailing your answer in to the clerk. Either way, you also want to submit a cop of your answer along with the original so that the clerk can stamp it and hand the copy back to you. This is your proof of filing the answer just in case the clerks misplace the answer (they do have lots of cases to manage by the way). If you mail your answer in, send a self-addressed, stamped envelope along with the original and copy so the clerk can mail it back to you.

Filing an answer in a lawsuit simply prevents the plaintiff from a quick and easy default judgment against you. It forces them to produce proof to the court. They may do this by way of a Summary Judgment or it may end up being a hearing (especially if it is small claims court). Either way, it typically gains you extra time to either file bankruptcy or prepare a defense.

Advertisements

August 8, 2014 - Posted by | Alternate Debt Relief, attorney fees, Bankruptcy, Chapter 13, Chapter 7, Planning, Pre-filing planning | , , , , , , , , , , ,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: