Kentucky Bankruptcy Law

Counsel with Care

Attorney fees in a Chapter 7 or 13

Times remain tough all around despite pronouncements of recovery. It is always true that folks looking to file Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy have a hard time affording legal help for the process. This has become even more difficult in recent times. This can often be worked around in a Chapter 13 where attorney fees can often be paid through the plan itself. However, in n0-asset Chapter 7s, if attorney fees are not collected up front, then they are discharged with every other unsecured debt.

Often, Debtors have continued paying debts that will be included in the bankruptcy and discharged. So, if time permits before filing, those funds can be directed instead toward attorney fees. It can also help to pay the court filing fees ($306) in four installments rather than all at once. This works because the court has the power to dismiss the Chapter 7 if all fees are not paid.

I have also taken the step of reducing my Chapter 7 attorney fees down to rock bottom while still providing all the same services. I have not done a survey and I suspect that if folks call around they may find someone who will quote less, but I was recently told by one client who had called around that my fees were the lowest. I am able to do this because I do not have an elaborate marketing campaign and I keep all my other overhead items low. Even though my Chapter 7 fees are so low, I still do all the work myself.

Advertisements

September 3, 2012 - Posted by | attorney fees, Bankruptcy, Chapter 13, Chapter 7, Plan, Planning, Pre-filing planning | , , , , , , , , ,

4 Comments »

  1. […] Michael W. Troutman graduated from law school at the University of Kentucky in 1982 where he was a member of the Moot Court Board. He practiced law in Louisville from 1982-1988 with the law firm of Morgan & Pottinger. In 1988, he joined the law firm of Fowler, Measle, and Bell in Lexington, KY where his practice focused primarily in the areas of litigation, business, employment, construction and bankruptcy law. Mr. Troutman was a partner from 1991-2002 and served on the firm’s management committee from 1999-2001. From March 2002 until January 2004 he served as President and General Counsel of Dealers’ Financial Services, LLC, a national company with headquarters in Lexington, Kentucky. He began the law firm of Troutman & Hays, PLLC, now Troutman & Napier, PLLC, where he focuses his practice on business matters, litigation and mediation. He has been a speaker at several professional organizations on topics including employment, construction, bankruptcy, and mediation law. Email: mtroutman@troutmannapier.comSource: wordpress.com […]

    Pingback by In 2000s, middle class saw declines in income, net worth | Chapter 11 Bankruptcy Los Angeles California | September 6, 2012 | Reply

  2. […] low, I am able to offer consistently low fees on Chapter 7s and pre-petition fees on Chapter 13s (most post petition fees are paid through the plan). Since part of keeping the overhead low is that I do my own petition preparation rather than a […]

    Pingback by February Bankruptcy Fees Experiment « Kentucky Bankruptcy Law | February 6, 2013 | Reply

  3. […] low, I am able to offer consistently low fees on Chapter 7s and pre-petition fees on Chapter 13s (most post petition fees are paid through the plan). Since part of keeping the overhead low is that I do my own petition preparation rather than a […]

    Pingback by February Bankruptcy Fees Experiment « Kentucky Bankruptcy Law | February 6, 2013 | Reply

  4. […] low, I am able to offer consistently low fees on Chapter 7s and pre-petition fees on Chapter 13s (most post petition fees are paid through the plan). Since part of keeping the overhead low is that I do my own petition preparation rather than a […]

    Pingback by Troutman & Napier, PLLC | February Bankruptcy Fees Experiment | December 8, 2014 | Reply


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: